Atlanta Window Cleaning

Professional window cleaners have the experience and tools—such as ladders, plenty of towels, and multiple sizes of squeegees—to do the job correctly and efficiently. Hand washing and water-fed pole washing are the two major techniques for window cleaning.

Hand washing. Hand washing is as it sounds; a technician climbs a ladder to each individual window, hand-scrubs it, and then squeegees it.

Water-fed pole washing. Water-fed pole washing involves spraying, scrubbing, and rinsing the window from the ground below, using a hose and a brush on a long extension pole. This method also uses a water purification system, which limits spots on the windows. While hand washing is better because the technician can more easily see what he or she is doing, extra time is spent climbing and moving ladders. Water-fed pole washing is useful in situations where hand washing is not practical.

Many companies quote window cleaning over the phone. The price is usually quoted as a per window price. Then, when the technician arrives and evaluates the job in person, he or she adjusts the price accordingly. If you compare prices given over the phone, make sure you are comparing apples to apples. Some quotes may reflect a less thorough approach and/or less work, while others reflect a more thorough cleaning. Selecting a company on price alone, without comparing the service delivered, is an easy way to overpay.

Once the technician arrives and quotes a firm price, that price should not change unless you change the scope of the work. If you need to change the scope of the work after the job has begun, be sure to get a firm estimate of what the additional work will cost. Some companies may try to lowball you in the beginning and then charge for lots of little things, which you might have assumed were included in the original price.