Trees serve as local and national landmarks, beautify our surroundings, and rejuvenate landscapes with a host of environmental and social benefits. It’s little wonder then that humans have formed such meaningful relationships with trees over the years. Take a look at the following fun tree facts that represent just a few of the many wonderful benefits and features of trees.

oldest living organisms

The oldest living organisms on Earth are none other than trees. Many are known to be thousands of years old.

largest know living tree

The largest known living tree is nicknamed General Sherman, located in Sequoia National Park. The tree boasts an 11.1-meter diameter and is 83.8 meters tall.

study of 3 rings

The study of tree rings is called dendrochronology. Rings not only tell you how old a tree is, but they also give clues to climate conditions and natural disasters that occurred within a tree’s lifetime.

grown in urban environments

Trees grown in urban environments live much shorter lives than trees living in rural or forested areas, making professional tree care an important investment for urban homeowners.

lower air temp

Trees provide shade, lower air temperature, and keep the air fresh by replacing air pollutants with oxygen, reducing the “heat island” effect that plagues urban landscapes.

prevent soil erosion

Trees prevent soil erosion, reduce storm runoff, and even help to filter water.

trees curb psych

Trees curb the psychological and physical impacts of living in an urban community. A UK Forestry Commission study advocates that trees and woodland areas support health and emotional well-being by promoting physical activity and reducing stress.

well cared for trees

Well-cared-for trees and other landscaping can significantly raise property values.

lower energy bills

Interested in lowering energy bills? Directly shading your home or office building with trees can reduce air conditioning needs in the summer and heating costs in the winter.

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Sources: ACTrees; American Forests; Arbor Day Foundation; The Center for Clean Air Policy; International Society of Arboriculture; National Park Service; NC State University College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, Department of Horticulture Sciences; UK Forestry Commission.

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